Historic Sites
Learn through history by visiting interesting historic sites around the state of Texas. Historic sites let you put a real face on the history that you've read about, making it more exciting for you and your children.
Historic Sites in Texas
Fort Davis National Historic Site
Set in the rugged beauty of the Davis Mountains of west Texas, Fort Davis is one of America's best surviving examples of an Indian Wars' frontier military post in the Southwest. From 1854 to 1891, Fort Davis was strategically located to protect emigrants, mail coaches, and freight wagons on the Trans-Pecos portion of the San Antonio-El Paso Road and the Chihuahua Trail, and to control activities on the southern stem of the Great Comanche War Trail and Mescalero Apache war trails. Fort Davis is important in understanding the presence of African Americans in the West and in the frontier military because the 24th and 25th U.S. Infantry and the 9th and 10th U.S. Cavalry, all-black regiments established after the Civil War, were stationed at the post. Today, twenty-four roofed buildings and over 100 ruins and foundations are part of Fort Davis National Historic Site. Five of the historic buildings have been refurnished to the 1880s, making it easy for visitors to envision themselves being at the fort at the height of its development.
Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site
On May 8, 1846 troops of the United States and Mexico clashed on the prairie of Palo Alto in the first battle of a two-year war. Signed into law in June 1992, Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site located near Brownsville preserves the 3,400-acre scene of this clash between nations and informs visitors about its national and international importance. As the only unit of the National Park Service with a primary focus on the U.S.-Mexican War, Palo Alto Battlefield also interprets the entire conflict--including the details of its origins and the broad range of consequences. In an effort to turn a scene of conflict into a place of bi-national exchange and understanding, all research and interpretation conducted by the park reflects perspectives of both the United States and Mexico.
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